The Life Aquatic: Setting Sail for the Lake Champlain Maritime Museum | BTV Magazine | Seven Days | Vermont's Independent Voice

Local Guides » BTV Magazine

The Life Aquatic: Setting Sail for the Lake Champlain Maritime Museum

by

comment
An underwater shipwreck in Lake Champlain - PHOTOS COURTESY OF LAKE CHAMPLAIN MARITIME MUSEUM
  • Photos Courtesy Of Lake Champlain Maritime Museum
  • An underwater shipwreck in Lake Champlain

Version française

Summertime visitors to Burlington inevitably turn their eyes to Lake Champlain. Its sparkling waters invite all kinds of aquatic activity and reflect — to stunning effect — candy-colored sunsets. But these deep-blue waves also hold both history and mystery. Looking to dive into their depths? Head to the Lake Champlain Maritime Museum.

The word "museum" hardly does justice to this hidden gem in Vergennes, less than an hour south of Burlington. From late May to mid-October, it offers dynamic exhibits, classes and activities dedicated to preserving and teaching the history of Lake Champlain and the people and vessels that have plied its waters for centuries.

Rockin' the Boat

Philadelphia II, a replica of a 1776 gunboat - PHOTOS COURTESY OF LAKE CHAMPLAIN MARITIME MUSEUM
  • Photos Courtesy Of Lake Champlain Maritime Museum
  • Philadelphia II, a replica of a 1776 gunboat

A visitor could spend hours perusing the fascinating nautical-themed installations contained in more than a dozen buildings scattered across the museum grounds. Most pay tribute to the modes of travel that have been used on Lake Champlain, from Abenaki Indian canoes and horse-powered ferries to 19th-century steamboats and a 35-foot ice yacht dubbed the Storm King. Built in 1902, the yacht was the fastest form of human transportation in its day, capable of speeds of 120 miles per hour.

"The Key to Liberty: The Revolutionary War in the Champlain Valley" exhibit is a must-see for visitors interested in the American Revolution and the decisive naval battles that were fought on Lake Champlain. This permanent display features eyewitness accounts of the 1776 Battle of Valcour Island, including a nine-foot scale model of the gunboat Philadelphia that was sunk by the British Royal Navy — and later raised in 1935 and transported to a Smithsonian museum.

Aerial view of the Lake Champlain Maritime Museum shoreline - PHOTOS COURTESY OF LAKE CHAMPLAIN MARITIME MUSEUM
  • Photos Courtesy Of Lake Champlain Maritime Museum
  • Aerial view of the Lake Champlain Maritime Museum shoreline

The exhibit reflects research that's under way at the museum all year round. On-site archeologists and researchers are constantly discovering new artifacts to add — such as the cannon that exploded aboard the gunboat New York in 1776.

Indeed, Lake Champlain has one of the richest and most unique nautical histories of any body of water in North America. It's home to more than 300 shipwrecks dating back to the French and Indian War of the mid-18th century, and new wrecks are still being discovered. Because the museum is contracted with the State of Vermont to maintain and oversee these underwater cultural resources, it opens its conservation lab to visitors, allowing them to witness how artifacts are restored and preserved.

Two wreck exhibits that are prominently featured, the General Butler and O.J. Walker, later became the inspiration for building a replica schooner, the Lois McClure. Originally intended as a permanently moored exhibit on Burlington's waterfront, the Lois McClure was such a successful outreach tool for the museum that it now takes regular excursions as far as Long Island, N.Y., and Québec City. On July 4th weekend, the schooner begins a two-month journey to Buffalo, N.Y., to mark the bicentennial of the Erie Canal construction.

All Hands on Deck

Visitors on a shipwreck tour - PHOTOS COURTESY OF LAKE CHAMPLAIN MARITIME MUSEUM
  • Photos Courtesy Of Lake Champlain Maritime Museum
  • Visitors on a shipwreck tour

Central to the museum's mission is keeping alive traditional nautical skills through workshops, classes and trips on the water. About twice a month, the museum operates a 50-passenger vessel called the Escape. Visitors can climb aboard and — without ever donning a scuba suit — explore wrecks along the lake bottom via a live video feed from a remotely operated underwater vehicle. Says museum codirector Joyce Cameron, "You see it really clearly on a big screen, all with a cocktail in hand."

Throughout the summer, visitors can also choose from an à la carte menu of classes. These include daily demonstrations and instruction in traditional glassblowing — once used for making navigational lights, lighthouse lenses, deck lights and prisms.

"Discovery of Spitfire" painting by Ernie Haas - PHOTOS COURTESY OF LAKE CHAMPLAIN MARITIME MUSEUM
  • Photos Courtesy Of Lake Champlain Maritime Museum
  • "Discovery of Spitfire" painting by Ernie Haas

The museum is also home to one of New England's largest blacksmith shops. About 10 years ago, while building the replica of the gunship Philadelphia, the museum built an 18th-century-style forge. That exhibit proved so popular that, in 2008, a new forge was opened for teaching blacksmithing, metalworking and bronze casting.

Visitors can also check out one of the museum's fleet of 18 rowing gigs, which are available daily for hourlong self-guided trips on the lake, weather permitting. (Register in advance to complete the necessary training and safety check.)

Sound like too much to experience in just one day? Museum codirector Erick Tichonuk remembers walking the grounds last summer when he asked a visitor what he thought of the place.

"He said, 'I'm pissed!' So I asked him what's wrong," Tichonuk recalled. "He said, 'I read somewhere that I should allow two hours at the museum — and I've spent two hours in just the first two buildings!'"

Not a problem, Tichonuk reassured his guest. A day pass is good for a return visit the following day.

On the Waterfront

Rowers in a longboat - PHOTOS COURTESY OF LAKE CHAMPLAIN MARITIME MUSEUM
  • Photos Courtesy Of Lake Champlain Maritime Museum
  • Rowers in a longboat

The museum takes part in the Lake Champlain Maritime Festival July 27 to 30 in Burlington's Waterfront Park, showcasing classic longboats, canoes, kayaks and dragon-boat demonstrations that commemorate the past, present and future of Lake Champlain. The fest also features boat-building demos, local food, live music and hands-on exhibits for kids. lcmfestival.com


Mettez les voiles vers le Musée maritime du lac Champlain

An underwater shipwreck in Lake Champlain - PHOTOS COURTESY OF LAKE CHAMPLAIN MARITIME MUSEUM
  • Photos Courtesy Of Lake Champlain Maritime Museum
  • An underwater shipwreck in Lake Champlain

En visite à Burlington, l'été, on tourne inévitablement le regard vers le lac Champlain, dont les eaux miroitantes, propices à toutes les activités nautiques, reflètent chaque soir les vibrantes couleurs du coucher de soleil. Ces flots d'un bleu profond sont également riches en histoire et en mystère. Prêts à plonger? Rendez-vous au Musée maritime du lac Champlain.

Le mot « musée » ne rend pas justice à ce joyau qui se cache à Vergennes, moins d'une heure au sud de Burlington. De la fin mai à la mi-octobre, profitez des expositions, des cours et d'autres activités passionnantes vouées à la préservation et à l'enseignement de l'histoire du lac Champlain et des personnes et navires qui en sillonnent les eaux depuis des siècles.

Bienvenue à bord!

Philadelphia II, a replica of a 1776 gunboat - PHOTOS COURTESY OF LAKE CHAMPLAIN MARITIME MUSEUM
  • Photos Courtesy Of Lake Champlain Maritime Museum
  • Philadelphia II, a replica of a 1776 gunboat

Le musée regroupe plus d'une dizaine d'immeubles, qui recèlent de fascinantes installations nautiques, dont la plupart illustrent les moyens de transport utilisés sur le lac Champlain au fil du temps : canots abénakis, traversiers d'époque, bateaux à vapeur du 19e siècle et un voilier de glace de 10 mètres nommé Storm King. Ce dernier, construit en 1902, pouvait atteindre une vitesse de près de 200 km/heure – le moyen de transport humain le plus rapide de l'époque.

Les visiteurs intéressés par la Révolution américaine et les batailles navales décisives livrées sur le lac Champlain ne doivent surtout pas rater l'exposition permanente The Key to Liberty: The Revolutionary War in the Champlain Valley. Vous pourrez consulter des récits de témoins de la bataille de 1776 à l'île Valcour et admirer un modèle réduit de 2,75 m de la chaloupe canonnière Philadelphia coulée par la Marine royale britannique et ramenée à la surface en 1935, puis transportée à un musée Smithsonian.

Aerial view of the Lake Champlain Maritime Museum shoreline - PHOTOS COURTESY OF LAKE CHAMPLAIN MARITIME MUSEUM
  • Photos Courtesy Of Lake Champlain Maritime Museum
  • Aerial view of the Lake Champlain Maritime Museum shoreline

Cette exposition illustre bien le travail de recherche du musée. Sur place, des archéologues et des chercheurs découvrent constamment de nouveaux artéfacts, comme un canon qui a explosé à bord de la chaloupe canonnière New York en 1776.

Le lac Champlain a une histoire navale parmi les plus riches et uniques en Amérique du Nord. On y dénombre plus de 300 épaves remontant à l'époque de la Conquête, au 18e siècle – un chiffre qui augmente au rythme des nouvelles découvertes. Comme le musée a conclu avec l'État du Vermont une entente visant la préservation et la supervision de ces ressources culturelles immergées, son laboratoire de conservation est ouvert au public, qui peut observer les méthodes de restauration et de préservation.

Deux importantes expositions sur les naufrages du General Butler et de l'O.J. Walker ont inspiré la construction de la goélette Lois McClure. Conçu à l'origine pour rester amarré au port de Burlington, le Lois McClure s'est avéré un outil de promotion du musée si efficace qu'il effectue dorénavant des excursions jusqu'à Long Island (New York) et à Québec. Le weekend du 4 juillet, la goélette entreprendra un voyage de deux mois vers Buffalo (New York), pour les célébrations du bicentenaire de la construction du canal Érié.

Tous sur le pont

Visitors on a shipwreck tour - PHOTOS COURTESY OF LAKE CHAMPLAIN MARITIME MUSEUM
  • Photos Courtesy Of Lake Champlain Maritime Museum
  • Visitors on a shipwreck tour

La préservation du savoir-faire nautique traditionnel, au moyen d'ateliers, de cours et d'excursions sur l'eau, est au cœur de la mission du musée. Environ deux fois par mois, le musée invite une cinquantaine de personnes à monter à bord de l'Escape. Les passagers peuvent admirer les épaves sans équipement de plongée : on leur présente des images filmées en direct par un véhicule sous-marin télécommandé. « On voit tout très bien sur grand écran, un cocktail à la main, indique Joyce Cameron, codirectrice du musée. »

Pendant l'été, plusieurs cours sont offerts aux visiteurs, notamment des démonstrations quotidiennes de soufflage du verre, utilisé autrefois pour fabriquer des feux de navigation, des lentilles de phares à signaux, des verres de pont et des prismes.

"Discovery of Spitfire" painting by Ernie Haas - PHOTOS COURTESY OF LAKE CHAMPLAIN MARITIME MUSEUM
  • Photos Courtesy Of Lake Champlain Maritime Museum
  • "Discovery of Spitfire" painting by Ernie Haas

Le musée abrite également l'un des plus grands ateliers de forgeron de Nouvelle-Angleterre. Il y a environ 10 ans, pendant la construction de la réplique de la chaloupe canonnière Philadelphia, le musée a reproduit une forge du 18e siècle. L'exposition a connu une telle popularité qu'en 2008, une nouvelle forge a ouvert ses portes, destinée à l'enseignement de l'ouvrage de forge, du travail des métaux et du moulage en bronze.

Le musée met aussi à la disposition des visiteurs sa flotte de 18 gigues à rames pour des excursions autonomes d'une heure sur le lac, lorsque le temps le permet. (Inscrivez-vous à l'avance pour suivre la formation nécessaire et effectuer les contrôles de sécurité.)

Un programme chargé, vous dites? Erick Tichonuk, codirecteur du musée, a demandé à un visiteur son avis sur les lieux, l'été dernier.

« Il m'a dit qu'il était très mécontent, se souvient-il. Je lui ai demandé pourquoi et il m'a répondu qu'il avait lu quelque part de prévoir deux heures pour la visite du musée – or, il avait passé deux heures juste dans les deux premiers édifices! »

Erick a rappelé au client que les billets d'entrée sont valides deux jours de suite.

Au bord de l'eau

Rowers in a longboat - PHOTOS COURTESY OF LAKE CHAMPLAIN MARITIME MUSEUM
  • Photos Courtesy Of Lake Champlain Maritime Museum
  • Rowers in a longboat

Le musée prend part au Lake Champlain Maritime Festival.Du 27 au 30 juillet, le parc Waterfront de Burlington accueille chaloupes traditionnelles, canots, kayaks et démonstrations de bateau-dragon pour célébrer le passé, le présent et le futur du lac Champlain. Le festival propose également des démonstrations de construction navale, des mets locaux, des spectacles musicaux et des activités interactives pour les enfants. lcmfestival.com


Add a comment

Seven Days moderates comments in order to ensure a civil environment. Please treat the comments section as you would a town meeting, dinner party or classroom discussion. In other words, keep commenting classy! Read our guidelines...

Note: Comments are limited to 300 words.