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Rick Bornemann to Head Ethan Allen Institute

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The Ethan Allen Institute, long associated with former news commentator and former legislator John McClaughry, has a new president and chief executive officer.

RIck Bornemann, a former utilities executive and lobbyist, will take the helm of the 16-year-old free market think tank next month, according to a release from the institute this afternoon.

Earlier this year McClaughry announced he would step down as the organization's chief, but plans to remain on as vice president.

Bornemann was born and raised in Connecticut and is an economicsgraduate of Amherst College in Massachusetts. He returns to New Englandafter a 25-year career in the nation’s capital.

Beginning  as a legislative aide to an OregonCongressman, he served as a legislative  affairs representative for whatis now the Nuclear Energy Institute. He became a vice president of UnitedIlluminating (a Connecticut public utility), and then of Kansas CitySouthern Industries (a Midwestern railway holding company). He was most recently a strategist and lobbyist for Government Strategies Inc., a Washington government relations firm, according to the EAI release.

During his career in Washington, Bornemann specialized inbusiness, tax and regulatory issues, with a special focus oneconomic development, transportation and energy.

“I’m delighted to have been selected to lead EAI to a higherlevel of  activity and influence, as well as to return to my native NewEngland," said Bornemann in the statement. “Vermont is a state of great beauty, a high qualityof life, and good people. If we can couple those assets with sound publicpolicies that lead to  greater economic opportunity and prosperity, it canbecome a model for the nation."

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