Photos: Burlington's Trees Through the Ages | Slideshows | Seven Days | Vermont's Independent Voice

Photos: Burlington's Trees Through the Ages 

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Courtesy of Warren Spinner
Elms line the partially constructed promenade at Battery Park in 1938. Before Dutch elm disease ravaged Burlington's trees, more than 10,000 elms grew along the city's streets and in its parks.
Courtesy of Warren Spinner
Elms in Battery Park, 1938
Courtesy of Warren Spinner
Elms line the road at South Union and Adams Street, 1928
Courtesy of Warren Spinner
The same intersection, South Union and Adams, in 2015
Courtesy of Warren Spinner
The intersection of Spear Street and Main Street looking west toward UVM, 1934. The white barn on the right is close to where the UVM Davis Center now stands.
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Courtesy of Warren Spinner
Elms line the streets just north of the Shelburne Road rotary in 1940.
Courtesy of Warren Spinner
Bernie Sanders and volunteers plant trees on Burlington's North Avenue in 1985. As mayor, Sanders spearheaded an effort to reforest the city, replacing the elm stumps with new trees.
Courtesy of Warren Spinner
A newly planted honey locust tree on Monroe Street, 1983
Courtesy of Warren Spinner
The same honey locust on Monroe Street in 2014
Courtesy of Warren Spinner
Charlotte Street in 1983, with new trees
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Courtesy of Warren Spinner
Charlotte Street in 2014
Courtesy of Warren Spinner
Gazo Avenue looking toward Ethan Allen Park, just after the city planted new trees in 1983.
Courtesy of Warren Spinner
A grown-up green ash tree, at center, on Gazo Avenue in 2014.
Courtesy of Warren Spinner
Workers plant a green ash on King Street in 1992
Courtesy of Warren Spinner
That same green ash in 2016
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Courtesy of Warren Spinner
Elms line the partially constructed promenade at Battery Park in 1938. Before Dutch elm disease ravaged Burlington's trees, more than 10,000 elms grew along the city's streets and in its parks.

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