Obituary: John Carter, 1945-2021 | Obituaries | Seven Days | Vermont's Independent Voice

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Obituary: John Carter, 1945-2021

Waterbury community leader was affectionately nicknamed "the Mayor of Stowe Street"

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Jack Carter - COURTESY PHOTO
  • Courtesy Photo
  • Jack Carter

John "Jack" P. Carter passed on peacefully at home on June 21, 2021, at the age of 75. Jack was born on June 28,1945, in Windsor, Vt. He was the son of Nick and Ruth Carter and the youngest brother of Sherm and Taylor ("Jim"). He was educated in the Windsor School System and graduated from Windsor High School in 1963. Upon graduating, he attended Saint Michael’s College in Colchester, Vt.

Friends and relatives describe Jack as “passionate, compassionate, forward-looking, generous and incredibly honest.” He is regarded affectionately by many as “the Mayor of Stowe Street.”

Jack wished to make life better for others in Waterbury; he was involved in many aspects of the Waterbury community. He served on the Waterbury Selectboard. He was a leader of the Waterbury Historical Society and an avid local and state historian. Jack was a member of the Board of Civil Authority and was a familiar face at the polls, working as a local election official. He served on the Cemetery Commission and the Tree Committee. A longtime justice of of the peace, he was referred to by his extended family as “the Reverend,” and he officiated at his own niece and nephews’ weddings.

He enjoyed being a member and cochair of the Friends of the Vermont Statehouse and acted for many years as a tour guide of the Capitol Building, entertaining scores of visitors with his Vermont historical anecdotes and lore.

Jack’s love for Vermont was also expressed through his involvement in the 251 Club, of which he was the acting president for a number of years. He and Ted Schultheis, his life partner of 41 years, are Plus Members of the club, and together they visited all 251 towns and gores in Vermont.

Jack was an enthusiastic supporter of the arts and of historical restoration. He helped found Revitalizing Waterbury, the group that was the driving force behind the renovation of the Stimson and Graves Building on Stowe Street. Later he led the effort to bring the Waterbury Train Station back to its architectural glory.

For most of his adult life in Burlington, New York City and Waterbury, Jack worked in retail. He and his partner, Ted, were the longtime owners of the Stowe Street Emporium. The opening of the retail store in 1994 spearheaded the revitalization of downtown Waterbury.

As Waterbury municipal manager Bill Shepeluk said, “Jack was a dreamer and a visionary, and somebody who wanted to get things done. He wasn’t deterred by ‘you can’t.’ He’d say, ‘Why not?’”

“The Mayor of Stowe Street” is in our everlasting hearts and minds. Jack's love for his family, friends and community continues to inspire many to participate in making Waterbury and Vermont a special place to live. Jack was the best friend Waterbury ever had.

Jack is survived by his life partner, Ted Schultheis; brother Taylor ("Jim"); sisters-in-law Vivian and Susan; nieces and nephews; and countless friends.

Arrangements are by Perkins Parker Funeral Home in Waterbury. There will be a memorial service in August.

Donations in Jack’s honor and memory may be made to Waterbury Historical Society, c/o Paul Willard, P.O. Box 708, Waterbury, VT 05676 or Revitalizing Waterbury, Memo: to Jack’s Alley (in memory of Jack Carter), P.O. 473, Waterbury, VT 05676.

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