In Bloom: Garden-Themed Art Takes Root at Shelburne Museum | BTV Magazine | Seven Days | Vermont's Independent Voice

Local Guides » BTV Magazine

In Bloom: Garden-Themed Art Takes Root at Shelburne Museum

by

comment
“In the Midnight Garden” installation - by Jennifer Angus - COURTESY OF SHELBURNE MUSEUM
  • Courtesy of Shelburne Museum
  • “In the Midnight Garden” installationby Jennifer Angus

Version française

Visitors from across the globe are drawn to Vermont for the vibrancy and stark contrasts of its four seasons. After a long, snowy winter, nothing beats watching the world come back to life, one brave dandelion and greening bud at a time. This year, Shelburne Museum — just seven miles south of downtown Burlington — celebrates the blooming of springtime with its exhibition "In the Garden."

"Flowers and Butterfly Fireboard" by James Sharp - COURTESY OF SHELBURNE MUSEUM
  • Courtesy of Shelburne Museum
  • "Flowers and Butterfly Fireboard" by James Sharp

Founded in 1947 by heiress and dedicated art collector Electra Havemeyer Webb, Shelburne Museum is known for its sprawling grounds and vast holdings of folk art. Guests are invited to meander through history at more than 25 authentic New England period structures on-site — from a lighthouse to a hunter's cabin to a steamboat. "In the Garden" is housed in the Pizzagalli Center for Art and Education, the museum's year-round space for rotating exhibitions.

"Ring" by Marie Zimmermann - COURTESY OF SHELBURNE MUSEUM
  • Courtesy of Shelburne Museum
  • "Ring" by Marie Zimmermann

On view March 17 through August 26, "In the Garden" mines the past five centuries of material culture to explore humankind's relationship to flowers. It also turns its attention to flora's pollinating counterparts: creepy, crawly bugs!

As the artworks demonstrate, humans have long attempted to re-create the Garden of Paradise, and in a multitude of mediums. "In the Garden" references both botanical and entomological forms in handmade quilts, fine silverware, oil paintings, contemporary installation work and more.

"While certain works celebrate our instinctual emotional connection to flowers," head curator Kory Rogers says, "others challenge our cultural biases against insects. It is my sincere hope that visitors will take away a greater appreciation and understanding of the natural world in all its many forms."

"The Other Messengers" by M. Joan Lintault - COURTESY OF SHELBURNE MUSEUM
  • Courtesy of Shelburne Museum
  • "The Other Messengers" by M. Joan Lintault

The exhibition is divided into three thematic sections. "Flower Power: Desire, Love and Sentiment" explores the inherent pull of petals, from their hidden romantic meanings to their use in special-occasion bouquets.

Another section showcases the metal art of Marie Zimmermann. Considered by Rogers to be an under-recognized craftswoman and an "American treasure," Zimmermann kept a studio in New York from the early to mid-1900s. There, she created a large body of work that included ample, meticulously crafted floriform (flower-shaped) jewelry and decorative objects.

"Tin Whimsy Bowl of Flowers" by unknown artist - COURTESY OF SHELBURNE MUSEUM
  • Courtesy of Shelburne Museum
  • "Tin Whimsy Bowl of Flowers" by unknown artist

Finally, "Invasive Species: Insects in the Home" features artists and designers inspired by bugs. Canada native Jennifer Angus even welcomes them inside, using the exoskeletons of hundreds of insects — many of them in vibrant, luminescent shades — to create intricately pattered arrangements. One of these will grace a wall of the museum's Murphy Gallery.

Once you've toured the galleries, more gardens await outside: Shelburne Museum has some of Vermont's most magnificently landscaped grounds. Twenty-five varieties of peony? Check. Hundreds of fragrant lilac trees? Check. Brilliant orange daylilies? But of course. On a sunny day, it's hard to decide which is more stunning: the kaleidoscope of art on display inside or out.

Get Into the Garden

Butterfly Garden at Vermont Garden Park - COURTESY OF BUTTERFLY GARDEN
  • Courtesy of Butterfly Garden
  • Butterfly Garden at Vermont Garden Park

Want more buds and blossoms? Stroll the following Burlington-area gardens for a breath of fresh air.

Butterfly Garden at Vermont Garden Park

This South Burlington public garden is shaped like that most elegant and beloved of pollinators: the butterfly. Created in 2000 by the Burlington Garden Club, the modestly sized plot is a favorite among local artists and, yes, butterflies.

The Intervale Center

The Intervale Center - COURTESY OF THE INTERVALE CENTER
  • Courtesy of The Intervale Center
  • The Intervale Center

Burlington's 360-acre Intervale Center is a garden to beat all gardens. The nonprofit organization is dedicated to nurturing a thriving local food system, and its land is parceled into more than 150 community garden plots and fields actively worked by small farms. Recreation paths thread through the area, welcoming the public to visit any day of the year. Don't miss the Allée Portal, a magnificent stone archway built by community members under the guidance of artist Thea Alvin.

The Inn at Shelburne Farms

The Inn at Shelburne Farms - STEPHEN MEASE
  • Stephen Mease
  • The Inn at Shelburne Farms

On Lake Champlain's edge, the formal gardens of the Inn at Shelburne Farms offer picturesque pools, brick terraces and colorful perennial beds in the style of English cottage gardens. Part of a 1,400-acre working farm and forest, the inn and grounds of this Natural Historic Landmark open for the season in mid-May.


“In the Midnight Garden” installation - by Jennifer Angus - COURTESY OF SHELBURNE MUSEUM
  • Courtesy of Shelburne Museum
  • “In the Midnight Garden” installationby Jennifer Angus

Des visiteurs du monde entier affluent au Vermont pour ses quatre magnifiques saisons très contrastées. Après un long hiver sous la neige, il n'y a rien de plus beau que de voir le monde revenir à la vie, un brave pissenlit et un timide bourgeon à la fois. Cette année, le Shelburne Museum — à une dizaine de kilomètres au sud du centre-ville de Burlington — célèbre l'efflorescence printanière dans le cadre de l'exposition « In the Garden ».

Fondé en 1947 par la célèbre héritière et collectionneuse d'art Electra Havemeyer Webb, le Shelburne Museum est reconnu pour l'étendue de son domaine et ses vastes collections d'art populaire. Les visiteurs sont invités à explorer les méandres de l'histoire au détour de 25 structures authentiques de la période Nouvelle-Angleterre, depuis un phare jusqu'à une cabane de chasseur, en passant par un bateau à vapeur. L'exposition « In the Garden » se tiendra dans le Pizzagalli Center for Art and Education, ouvert à l'année, où se déroulent les expositions temporaires du musée.

"Flowers and Butterfly Fireboard" by James Sharp - COURTESY OF SHELBURNE MUSEUM
  • Courtesy of Shelburne Museum
  • "Flowers and Butterfly Fireboard" by James Sharp

Cette exposition, qui aura lieu du 17 mars au 26 août, puise dans cinq siècles d'histoire pour décortiquer les relations entre l'humanité et la flore. Les insectes et autres bestioles, essentiels à la pollinisation, sont également bien représentés!

"Ring" by Marie Zimmermann - COURTESY OF SHELBURNE MUSEUM
  • Courtesy of Shelburne Museum
  • "Ring" by Marie Zimmermann

Comme les œuvres le démontrent, les hommes ont longtemps essayé de reproduire le Jardin d'Éden, et ce, par tous les moyens possibles et imaginables. Courtepointes confectionnées à la main, pièces d'orfèvrerie, peintures à l'huile et installations contemporaines, d'inspiration botanique ou entomologique, en sont autant d'exemples.

« Certaines œuvres évoquent le lien émotionnel instinctif que nous entretenons avec les fleurs, explique Kory Rogers, le conservateur en chef, tandis que d'autres bousculent le préjugé défavorable que nous avons à l'égard des insectes. J'espère sincèrement que l'exposition permettra aux visiteurs de mieux comprendre et apprécier le monde naturel sous toutes ses formes. »

L'exposition est divisée en trois sections thématiques. « Flower Power: Desire, Love and Sentiment » explore le pouvoir attractif des fleurs, depuis leurs connotations romantiques cachées jusqu'à leur utilisation dans les bouquets pour les occasions spéciales.

"The Other Messengers" by M. Joan Lintault - COURTESY OF SHELBURNE MUSEUM
  • Courtesy of Shelburne Museum
  • "The Other Messengers" by M. Joan Lintault

La deuxième section met en valeur les œuvres d'art métalliques de Marie Zimmermann. Cette artiste, véritable « trésor de l'Amérique » qui gagnerait à être plus connue, selon Kory Rogers, avait un atelier à New York au début des années 1900, où elle a créé un vaste corpus d'œuvres floriformes (en forme de fleur) minutieusement travaillées, notamment des bijoux et d'autres objets décoratifs.

"Tin Whimsy Bowl of Flowers" by unknown artist - COURTESY OF SHELBURNE MUSEUM
  • Courtesy of Shelburne Museum
  • "Tin Whimsy Bowl of Flowers" by unknown artist

Enfin, la section « Invasive Species: Insects in the Home » présente les œuvres d'artistes et de designers inspirés par les insectes. La Canadienne Jennifer Angus se sert de l'exosquelette de centaines d'insectes – dont beaucoup arborent d'éclatantes teintes luminescentes – afin de créer des agencements aux motifs complexes. L'une de ses œuvres ornera même un mur de la galerie Murphy du musée.

Quand vous aurez parcouru les galeries, ne manquez pas d'aller visiter les jardins à l'extérieur : l'aménagement paysager du Shelburne Museum compte parmi les plus beaux du Vermont. Venez admirer les vingt-cinq variétés de pivoines, les centaines de lilas parfumés et les superbes hémérocalles orange vif. Par beau temps, les jardins extérieurs rivalisent de beauté avec le kaléidoscope d'œuvres d'art qu'on trouve à l'intérieur.

Get Into the Garden

Butterfly Garden at Vermont Garden Park - COURTESY OF BUTTERFLY GARDEN
  • Courtesy of Butterfly Garden
  • Butterfly Garden at Vermont Garden Park

Pour poursuivre votre parcours fleuri, voici quelques jardins de la région de Burlington qui valent le détour .

Butterfly Garden at Vermont Garden Park

Ce jardin public de South Burlington a la forme du plus élégant et du plus aimé de tous les pollinisateurs : le papillon. Créé en 2000 par le Burlington Garden Club, ce jardin aux dimensions modestes fait le bonheur des artistes locaux et, bien entendu, des papillons.

The Intervale Center

The Intervale Center - COURTESY OF THE INTERVALE CENTER
  • Courtesy of The Intervale Center
  • The Intervale Center

L'Intervale Center, qui s'étend sur 1,45 km2 à Burlington, est le jardin par excellence. Cet organisme sans but lucratif se consacre à la production alimentaire locale, et son terrain est morcelé en plus de 150 jardins et potagers communautaires où s'activent de petits agriculteurs. Le site, ouvert au public à l'année, est sillonné de sentiers. Ne manquez pas le « portail de l'allée », une magnifique arche de pierre que les membres de la communauté ont bâtie sous la supervision de l'artiste Thea Alvin.

The Inn at Shelburne Farms

The Inn at Shelburne Farms - STEPHEN MEASE
  • Stephen Mease
  • The Inn at Shelburne Farms

Au bord du lac Champlain, dans les jardins à la française de l'auberge de Shelburne Farms, on trouve des bassins pittoresques, des terrasses de briques et des massifs de fleurs vivaces colorées dans le style des jardins de campagne anglais. L'auberge et les jardins, situés sur un site historique d'intérêt national de 5,7 km2 comprenant également une ferme en activité et une forêt, ouvrent à la mi-mai.


Did you appreciate this story?

Show us your ❤️ by becoming a Seven Days Super Reader.

Add a comment

Seven Days moderates comments in order to ensure a civil environment. Please treat the comments section as you would a town meeting, dinner party or classroom discussion. In other words, keep commenting classy! Read our guidelines...

Note: Comments are limited to 300 words.