Trick or Treat? | Freyne Land

Trick or Treat?

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Yes, indeed. It's a frightening world out there awaiting these little ones from the Burlington YMCA observing Halloween on the Church Street Marketplace yesterday as darkness fell.

It's for them, is it not, that we grown-up types must pay attention to the goings on at the top in this dismal, depressing and frightening Age of Bush II?

Serious attention, eh?

For All Hallows Eve "fright," how about former Bush Defense Secretary Donald Rumsfeld's "snowflakes," reported on by Robin Wright in today's Washington Post?

Don't know about you, but it only confirms what a scary dude Ol' Donny really is.

In a series of internal musings and memos to his staff, then-Defense Secretary Donald H. Rumsfeld argued that Muslims avoid "physical labor" and wrote of the need to "keep elevating the threat," "link Iraq to Iran" and develop "bumper sticker statements" to rally public support for an increasingly unpopular war...

Under siege in April 2006, when a series of retired generals denounced him and called for his resignation in newspaper op-ed pieces, Rumsfeld produced a memo after a conference call with military analysts. "Talk about Somalia, the Philippines, etc. Make the American people realize they are surrounded in the world by violent extremists," he wrote.

People will "rally" to sacrifice, he noted after the meeting. "They are looking for leadership. Sacrifice = Victory."

The meeting also led Rumsfeld to write that he needed a team to help him "go out and push people back, rather than simply defending" Iraq policy and strategy. "I am always on the defense. They say I do it well, but you can't win on the defense," he wrote. "We can't just keep taking hits."

Based on the discussion with military analysts, Rumsfeld tied Iran and Iraq. "Iran is the concern of the American people, and if we fail in Iraq, it will advantage Iran," he wrote in his April 2006 memo.

Surprised?

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