Stuck in Vermont: Painting with Pepperoni, a Miniature Horse; Judi Whipple; and Jane Bradley at Breckenridge Farm in Plainfield | Stuck in Vermont | Seven Days | Vermont's Independent Voice

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Stuck in Vermont: Painting with Pepperoni, a Miniature Horse; Judi Whipple; and Jane Bradley at Breckenridge Farm in Plainfield

Episode 686

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Published March 23, 2023 at 7:30 a.m.
Updated March 23, 2023 at 9:40 a.m.


Pepperoni is a 21-year-old miniature horse who has spent most of his life with Judi Whipple at Breckenridge Farm in Plainfield. Judi has devoted her life to working with horses, and she runs an equine training center with her husband, Craig Whipple. Pepperoni was part of Judi’s Trick Team, which also included his girlfriend, Tutti Frutti, a mini horse; a donkey called Dolly D. Donkey; and a mare named Sombra. The group entertained audiences during equestrian events and community gatherings.

Almost two years ago, Pepperoni lost his right eye, and Judi teamed up with Jane Bradley to help Pepperoni find a new purpose in life. Jane is a former rider who has mobility issues due to muscular dystrophy. Her daughter and granddaughter continue to ride at the farm.

Jane and Judi meet every Wednesday to paint with Pepperoni in the indoor arena at Breckenridge Farm. Nicknamed PoNeigh, which rhymes with Monet, Pepperoni was already trained to pick up roses in his mouth. Now he picks up paintbrushes and smears paint across the canvas. His paintings have proven a big hit among the horse crowd, and he does art demos for his fans. What began as art therapy for PoNeigh has become art therapy for Jane and Judi as well.

Eva met up with Pepperoni and his team on St. Patrick’s Day and watched two canvases be painted. You can follow PoNeigh’s adventures on Instagram.

Filming date: 3/17/23

Music: Nathan Moore, “Tinker Time”

This episode of Stuck in Vermont was supported by New England Federal Credit Union.

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