Sanders to Deliver Long-Awaited Speech on Democratic Socialism | Off Message

Sanders to Deliver Long-Awaited Speech on Democratic Socialism

by

1 comment
Sen. Bernie Sanders addresses supporters in Madison, Wis. - FILE: ERIC TADSEN
  • File: Eric Tadsen
  • Sen. Bernie Sanders addresses supporters in Madison, Wis.
Updated at 2:45 p.m.

Last month in Iowa, Sen. Bernie Sanders (I-Vt.) told reporters he planned to deliver a formal speech explaining democratic socialism, the political ideology to which he's long subscribed. 

"I think we have some explaining and work to do," he said at the time. "Because I think there are people who, when they hear the word 'socialist,' get very, very nervous."

After several delays, Sanders' presidential campaign announced Wednesday morning that he would deliver the speech Thursday afternoon at Georgetown University. 

When Sanders first disclosed his plans last month, senior adviser Tad Devine told Seven Days that the democratic socialism address would be just one of several "set-piece" speeches on topics ranging from tax policy to foreign policy. But it looks like Sanders now plans to roll several topics into one speech. 

According to spokesman Michael Briggs, Thursday's remarks will touch on the candidate's "vision for creating an American future based on economic and social justice and environmental sanity" and will also include "specific ideas on U.S. foreign policy, how the U.S. can lead the world in defeating ISIS, and a long-term strategy to promote a safer and more peaceful world."

Briggs provided more details later Wednesday. He said Sanders plans to call for the country to “finally implement” President Franklin D. Roosevelt’s “Second Bill of Rights.” In January 1944, the 32nd president used his State of the Union address to call for the recognition of eight economic rights, including the right to a living wage, housing, medical care and education.

The speech will be live-streamed here


Comments

Showing 1-1 of 1

 

Add a comment

Seven Days moderates comments in order to ensure a civil environment. Please treat the comments section as you would a town meeting, dinner party or classroom discussion. In other words, keep commenting classy! Read our guidelines...

Note: Comments are limited to 300 words.