Former Democratic Party Official to Run for State Senate | Off Message

Former Democratic Party Official to Run for State Senate

by

David Scherr speaking at a January 2014 meeting of the Chittenden County Democratic Party - FILE: PAUL HEINTZ
  • File: Paul Heintz
  • David Scherr speaking at a January 2014 meeting of the Chittenden County Democratic Party
Barely an hour after Sen. David Zuckerman (P/D-Chittenden) disclosed Tuesday that he's leaving the Vermont Senate to run for lieutenant governor, another politico volunteered for his old job.

David Scherr, a 33-year-old former chair of the Chittenden County Democratic Party, emailed friends and supporters to say that he would run for Senate in 2016.

The Burlington attorney, who specializes in juvenile, family and criminal law, says his work defending those struggling to get by has inspired him to seek public office.

"I'm running because I'm a lifelong Vermonter, and I work every day on behalf of low-income folks in the state," he says. "It's an honor and a privilege to work with people on a case-by-case basis, but in doing that I've seen issues common to many cases, and I realize there are real policy issues we need to address on a broader scale."

The Norwich native attended Amherst College and Columbia Law School. He recently concluded a two-year stint as chair of the county party and previously served nearly two years as chair of the Burlington Democratic Party.

Scherr plans to seek the Democratic nomination to join Chittenden County's six-member delegation. In addition to Zuckerman, the district is currently represented by Democratic Sens. Phil Baruth, Ginny Lyons, Michael Sirotkin; Democrat/Progressive Tim Ashe; and Republican Diane Snelling. None of the other incumbents have announced their plans for 2016, though Baruth has said he, too, is eying the LG race.

Disclosure: Tim Ashe is the domestic partner of Seven Days publisher and coeditor Paula Routly.

Related Stories

Speaking of...

Tags

Comments

Showing 1-1 of 1

 

Comments are closed.

From 2014-2020, Seven Days allowed readers to comment on all stories posted on our website. While we've appreciated the suggestions and insights, right now Seven Days is prioritizing our core mission — producing high-quality, responsible local journalism — over moderating online debates between readers.

To criticize, correct or praise our reporting, please send us a letter to the editor or send us a tip. We’ll check it out and report the results.

Online comments may return when we have better tech tools for managing them. Thanks for reading.