Monday's Child: Nostalgia at the Vermont Toy Museum | Live Culture

Monday's Child: Nostalgia at the Vermont Toy Museum

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Last week, Connecticut-based filmmaker Ben Churchill sent me a link to his recently completed documentary, "Toy Place," about the Toy Museum located in the Vermont Antique Mall in Quechee. Now, I had been to the antique mall a number of times and never noticed the museum, right upstairs.

But as it happened, I was in the Upper Valley this past weekend (to see the work-in-progress opera Tesla in New York, which I previewed last week; it was intriguing, as is Jim Jarmusch's hair, but I digress). So, on the way home, my friend and I stopped in to the mall, right on Route 4.

Churchill's video conveys what we saw better than I can in words, so check it out:

If you watched "Toy Place," you saw that it evokes an "I used to have one of those!" comment from pretty much everyone who enters (including myself). Except perhaps for the littlest visitors, too young for nostalgia, who wish they did have one of those dolls, games, trucks, lunch boxes, etc. right now. And all of those awesome Star Wars action figures!

Everything here is behind glass (I don't know how Churchill managed to film it with all the reflections!), so the toys — arranged by decade — are safe from eager viewers big or small. The collector, Gary Neil, wasn't there during my visit, which is too bad. I would have liked to tell him I came because of Ben Churchill's cool vid.

He put it on YouTube for all to see, and at the moment doesn't have other plans for the doc, Churchill told me. It's filed among the other videos in his Radio Trip Pictures series, which are also worth a look.

Warning: Seeing the toys will make you feel all warm and fuzzy about your childhood pastimes, but it just might also make you wonder how you got to be so old, so fast.

"Monday's Child" contemplates events, people, places or things experienced over the weekend past.

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